Whose interests does the Royal College of Psychiatrists really serve? – a case in anthropological activism.

By James Davies When you consult the Royal College of Psychiatrist’s website it proclaims that one if its primary aims is to ‘improve the mental health of individuals, their families and communities’[i]– thus, to act in the public interest. Recent events at the Royal College put that proclamation in serious doubt. The first concerns the College’s Read More…

New CRESIDA doctoral dissertation on animal sacrifice and ritual offerings in Afro-Brazilian Candomblé

Giovanna Capponi, a CRESIDA student, has successfully completed her PhD Viva based on her study of human-environmental relations and sacrificial offerings in Candomblé – an Afro-Brazilian religion.  Giovanna, originally from Italy and with Master’s degrees from SOAS and the University of Bologna, is one of several PhD students who have been working on the multi-disciplinary AHRC-funded research Read More…

Hidden Anthropology Gems: Etnicidad, identidad y migraciones

By Ricardo R. Ontillera Sánchez Today, English is increasingly considered to be the ‘global language of science’ and has developed practically a monopoly in international periodical publications. With 90 percent of articles in the natural sciences and well over three-quarters in the social sciences and humanities written in English, researchers from around the globe have little Read More…

CRESIDA doctoral dissertation on the convergence between geology and society

Jonathan Karkut, a CRESIDA student, has successfully completed his PhD Viva based on his work on the anthropology of public policy within the context of the UNESCO global geoparks network. Having qualified first as a geologist (including experience in the fields of exploration, mining and in the British Geological Survey), then gaining post-graduate and professional training Read More…