Humans and Other Primates: Cultural complexity in mountain gorillas and Bornean orangutans

In our second year Humans and Other Primates  module, students are provided with a foundation in evolutionary anthropology through an understanding of primate biology and evolution. This week, we are featuring our second essay on this topic, by Hovnan Gulbenkian Eayrs. Hovnan’s bio: I’m a second year student from Oxford. I discovered my interest in anthropology after Read More…

The MRes in Primate Biology, Behaviour and Conservation @ Roehampton – why I chose it, what I studied, and where it has taken me

By Raphaela Heesen There are lots of different masters’ courses in the field of evolutionary anthropology; in this piece I wanted to explain how I came to join the MRes Primate Biology, Behavior and Conservation at Roehampton, and what I feel the course has given me. Having received a Bachelor of Science from the Rheinische Read More…

Does alloparental care vary across a rural-urban gradient in north-western Tanzania?

This week in the CRESIDA seminar series, our speaker is Anushe Hassan from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, who is sharing his research on alloparental care in Tanzania. Come and join us on Thursday, February 14th at 4.15pm in Room G070 at Parkstead House to learn more. Abstract Human mothers receive substantial support from extended Read More…

Humans and other Primates: the differences in cultural complexity between orangutans and chimpanzees

In our second year Humans and Other Primates  module, students are provided with a foundation in evolutionary anthropology through an understanding of primate biology and evolution. This week, our featured essay is by Daniel Wright. Daniel’s bio: I am a second year anthropology student from South East London. Since a very young age, I have been keen on Read More…

Navigation patterns in a Neotropical primate (Alouatta pigra): when cognition meets energetics

This week in the CRESIDA seminar series, the speaker is Miguel de Guinea, a doctoral student from Oxford Brookes University, who is sharing his research on navigation patterns in black howler monkeys. Come and join us on Thursday, January 17th at 4.15pm in Room G070 at Parkstead House to learn more. Abstract Animal navigation requires a continuous Read More…

Geographic variation in the human birth canal and its implications for the ‘obstetrical dilemma’ theory

The human birth canal is just large enough for the newborn, making childbirth a difficult and often dangerous process. In a recent study published in the Royal Society, Lia Betti (University of Roehampton) and Andrea Manica (University of Cambridge) show that there is substantial variation in the shape of the female pelvis across human populations, and that most Read More…

Parental investment in Agta foragers

This week in the CRESIDA seminar series, the speaker is Dr Abigail Page, a research fellow in the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. Her talk is on parental investment in Agta foragers in the Philippines.  Come and join us on Thursday, November 1st, at 4.15pm in Room G070 at Parkstead House to learn more. Abstract Read More…